Special Form Cut Index

Special Form Cut Index

Special Form Cut Index

I recently did a video about how we make step indexes on perfect bound books by trimming the face edge of book pages. We recently had a customer ask for us to cut a special form cut index on a run of Smyth sewn books. This appealing and smooth type of index is a combination of a single 90 degree step cut from the outside and a rounded cut on the inside.

Special Form Cut Index

Special Form Cut Index

We can do a full range of step index cutting:

•  Form cut

•   Full step cutting

•   Corner step cutting

•   Single Bank

•   Double Bank

Special Form Cut Index

Unlike standard index cutting, custom form cutting is done on a different machine. This machine can do the rounded edges and creates a smooth and more durable index edge.

Does your customer need index cutting on their perfect bound or Smyth sewn books? Please give us a call to talk about standard step cutting, corner cutting and custom form cutting.

20” Extra Wide Smythe Sewn Books

20” Extra Wide Smythe Sewn Books

20” Extra Wide Smythe Sewn Books

I’m excited to announce another one of our many innovations in bindery! We can Smythe / Singer Sew impressive books up to 20 inches wide (from the spine to the face), which are hand fed into our machines! We’re one of only a few trade shops in North America that can do this.

20” Extra Wide Smythe Sewn Books

The images shown are of blank test samples, which have not yet been trimmed. Finished books would be trimmed before having a cover drawn on to look like a perfect bound book or being cased into a hardcover. Very few binderies can sew 20 inches wide, which is an impressive 40 inches wide when opened! Does your client have a request or design for an usually large Smythe sewn book? Give us a call!

As you can see, when these extra wide books lay open, they are an incredible 40” across. Opened Smythe / Singer sewn books lay relatively flat, so they’re a great option for graphics-heavy books.

As the demand for more distinctive, wider, memorable books grows, we keep finding ways to innovate!

20” Extra Wide Smythe Sewn Books

Exposed smyth sewn books

It was only five years ago that we produced our first “exposed smyth sewn book!”  Since then the style has become more common.  Basically, this style of binding is very same as smyth sewn hard cover/hard back books except…the “sewn spine” is not covered!  The first picture is an “exposed smyth sewn book” with only a limp or flexible cover, front and back.  Picture #2 and #3 have a board wrapped cover.  When we produce these books, we apply white liquid glue to the spine to hold the sewn sections together more tightly.  Picture #4 is the same style of binding, except we have added food coloring to the glue, in this case blue, so the spine is solid blue.  If you look carefully you can see the thread lines on the spine.  We have several different colours of thread.  You can see in picture #3 that the thread is black.  Picture #5 is a very thin book with a flexible cover.

Exposed smyth sewn books

Exposed smyth sewn books

Exposed smyth sewn books

Exposed smyth sewn books

Exposed smyth sewn books

Exposed smyth sewn books

Exposed Smythe

What are Exposed Smythe Sewn Books? This style of binding has no cover on the spine. One the spine, all you see is folded sections, thread and glue.

Exposed Smythe

The image below is the first we ever bound in this style for a major Toronto printer. Since then, we have done several. I’ve said before that I’m not smart enough to know the difference between a fad and a trend. Which one is Exposed Smythe Sewn Books? I can’t say for certain, but we keep seeing more of them!

Exposed Smythe

The next image is of a piece we screen printed on rough board, which we then mounted full surface to the first page.

Exposed Smythe

We’ve done books as shown below where we dye the glue, which gives the spine a solid colour.

Exposed Smythe

A special feature that can only be shown off on Exposed Smythe Sewn Books is having each line of thread a different colour! You can see this unique effect in the image below. On this particular book, you’ll notice the green stained book edge … this is something we can add to several other binding styles.

Exposed Smythe

Other value added features we can add to Exposed Smythe Sewn Books are:

  1. The printer prints one different coloured line on each section that we fold, collate and sew. The results is, for instance, a 10 section product that would have 10 different colours on the spine.
  2. We have produced books with up to 12 different colours of threads.
  3. We dye the glue to have 1 or more colours of glue on the spine

Features

  • Alternating smooth/bumpy spine – tactile
  • Coloured thread and/or dyed glued spine
  • Shiny spine

Benefits

  • Lays as flat as a regular Smythe sewn book
  • Same durability as a regular Smyth sewn book or casebound/hardback book

Factor to Consider

 This style of binding doesn’t currently allow for printing on the spine, so there’s no title visible when on a bookshelf.

Exposed Smyth Sewn Books

What are “exposed Smyth sewn” books?

I saw the first exposed Smyth sewn books only four years ago. The photo below is the first exposed Smyth Sewn book we bound.

ANSTEY 537

What is the difference between this binding style and a regular Smyth sewn hard cover book? The difference is that there is no material covering the sewing on the spine and the spine is generously covered with cold glue.

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As with a regular Smyth sewn book, several different colours of threads can be used. Exposed Smyth binding really shows off the different thread colours

Is this binding method a fad or a trend? I’m not sure BUT we are certainly seeing a lot of them.

ANSTEY 574

Features

  • Hard cover on front and back of book
  • Cover thickness up to 120pt
  • Flush 3-side trimmed; cover does not overhang on three sides like a regular case bound book
  • Thread exposed in spine
  • No title/printing on spine

IMG_7760

ANSTEY_589

Benefits

  • When the book is open, it lies as flat as a case bound book
  • It’s eye catching!
  • Looks handmade, natural …
  • Can be cheaper than a case bound book

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Factors to consider

  • Think about what will be printed, foil stamped, embossed, debossed, screen printed or mounted on the front and back covers. We’ve seen all 5 processes used, sometimes in combinations
  • Let us specify the board to be used. This benefits you in two ways. The board we choose is warp resistant and will work with whatever ‘print’ method you choose